The Three Little Missionaries

By John McNeil

Summary

What happens when three little missionaries seeking their ministry in the big wide world encounter the Big Bad Wolf.

Characters

This play was originally performed with a combination of puppets and live actors. The live actors work outside the puppet stage. The Narrator can be a voice over the sound system.

Script

 

Narrator

Once upon a time there were Three Little Missionaries, who set out to seek their fortune in the big wide world of the mission field. So their mother packed them six peanut butter sandwiches each, and they kissed her goodbye.

Missionaries & mother

Kisses, hugs, tearful farewells, etc

Narrator

The 1st Little Missionary took his peanut butter sandwiches and set off to seek some training for the task ahead. On the way he met a man carrying a barrowload of straw.

Man

Good morning, Little Missionary, and where are you going on this fine morning.

1st Little Missionary

Good morning, Mr Man. I'm going to learn how to become a Missionary. I want to go to the deepest, darkest Africa, so I'm off to find a good training school.

Man

You are going to waste all that precious time training? Think of the souls that will be lost while you waste time in a classroom! Better by far to have faith. Follow your calling. Depend on God to get you through. Here, you can buy my straw - just what you need to build a hut in deepest, darkest Africa.

1st Little Missionary

Well... if you say so. Thankyou for your timely advice. Goodbye. (Both exit)

Narrator

The 1st Little Missionary took the barrow load of straw, caught a boat and sailed for Africa. When he finally arrived, he quickly built his grass hut. He had only just moved in when along came a Big Bad Wolf, who said:

Wolf

(Carrying drum) Little Missionary, Little Missionary, let me come in.

1st Little Missionary

No, no, no, not by the hair of my chinny chin chin.

Wolf

Then I'll huff and I'll puff till I blow your house in.

Narrator

So the Big Bad Wolf huffed and he puffed, and he danced and he drummed, and he blew the straw house in. Then the Big Bad went out and hired a big fat malaria mosquito, which bit the 1st Little Missionary, who got malaria and had to be sent home.

Now the 2nd Little Missionary packed his peanut butter sandwiches AND his pedal-powered colour television set and set off to train for his mission field - the jungles of South America. On the way he met a man carrying some sticks.

Man

Good morning, Little Missionary. And where are you going on this fine morning?

2nd Little Missionary

Good morning, Mr Man. I'm going to learn how to be a missionary in the jungles of South America.

Man

You've run into just the right person, then. Not only are these house sticks perfect to build a hut in the jungles of South America, but I can also train you for the job, both of which you may have for a very modest sum.

2nd Little Missionary

But I need a church to support me, to help me with prayer - and the money, of course.

Man

Nonsense. Do you have no faith? You must depend on God, like all good little missionaries.

2nd Little Missionary

W-e-l-l, if you say so, I will come with you.

(Both exit)

Narrator

Finally, after 3 months of training, the 2nd Little Missionary arrived in the jungles of South America. But as soon as he had built his house of sticks and erected his satellite TV dish, who should come along but the Big Bad Wolf.

Wolf

Little Missionary, Little Missionary, let me come in.

2nd Little Missionary

No, no! Not by the hair of my chinny chin chin.

Wolf

Then I'll huff and I'll puff, and I'll blow your house in.

Narrator

So the Big Bad Wolf huffed and he puffed - and he puffed and he huffed - and finally he succeeded in blowing the house in. Then the Big Bad Wolf disguised himself as a government official, who refused to extend his visa.

Govt. Official (Wolf)

Little Missionary, you will hereby leave the jungles of South America and catch the next plane home.

2nd Little Missionary

Oh no, because I have no church support, I don't even have enough money for the ticket. I will have to ask my rich uncle to loan me the money, and he's not even a Christian!

Narrator

Now the 3rd Little Missionary set off with his peanut butter sandwiches, his Bible College Diploma, his Wycliffe Graduation Certificate and his Jungle Camp training, not to mention his malaria tablets, visa, pith helmet, dictionary of native languages, and last but not least, his Bible! Whew!

On the way, he met a man carrying a load of bricks.

Man

Good morning, Little Missionary, and where are you going on this fine morning?

3rd Little Missionary

Good morning, Mr Man. God has called me to help train pastors in Northern Bangladesh, and I'm just heading off.

Man

I can see you are well prepared. Would you like some bricks to build a good strong home when you get there?

3rd Little Missionary

What a good idea! Thank you, I will.

Narrator

Soon the 3rd Little Missionary had arrived in Bangladesh, where he quickly built his house of bricks. Just as well, for who should be lurking around the corner but . . . .

Wolf

Little Missionary, Little Missionary, let me come in.

3rd Little Missionary

No, no! Not by the hair of my chinny chin chin.

Wolf

Then I'll huff and I'll puff and you know what happens next.

Narrator

So the Big Bad Wolf huffed and he puffed. And he puffed and he huffed. And he h-puffed and he p-huffed. But he soon fell down completely puffed out.

The 3rd Little Missionary was very glad that he had built his house carefully, making it good and strong, and that he had asked his home church to pray for his safety. But the wily old wolf was not giving up that easily.

He whispered in the ear of the village shaman, to stir up the people against the 3rd Little Missionary. The shaman began dancing round and ranting, and soon an angry crowd began to gather. (The wolf continues prowling in the background.)

Shaman

Let us chase the foreigner out of our village!

3rd Little Missionary

Oh dear, that does not look very healthy. I think I had better slip away for a while till things quieten down. Which way shall I go? (To audience) Should I climb up the chimney? (The wolf nods agreement.)

Audience

No, not the chimney!

3rd Little Missionary

No, I'd better not use the chimney. That's the Big Bad Wolf's favourite trick. I know, I'll go out the back door.

Narrator

But the Little Missionary was spotted by some villagers, who chased him. He started to run. Spotting an open doorway nearby, he ducked inside to hide.

Inside, he saw a young boy lying on a low bed, obviously sick with fever. Forgetting about his own troubles, the Little Missionary went over to the boy. Taking some medicine out of the haversack he always carried, the Little Missionary gave a big spoonful to the boy.

Boy (sits up)

Ooh, what lovely medicine. That feels much better.

Narrator

Just then, the boy's father came in. He was the chief of the village, and when he saw what the Little Missionary had done for his son, he immediately went out and told all the people to stop persecuting the missionary.

Chief

And I also hereby banish the Big Bad Wolf from the village for ever more.

Villagers

(Great cheers)

Narrator

When the people back in the Little Missionary's home church heard what had happened, they all rejoiced, and were so thankful to God they immediately doubled their faith promise missionary support. And they all lived happily ever after.


© John McNeil 1992
All rights reserved
This play may be performed free of charge, on the condition that copies are not sold for profit in any medium, nor any entrance fee charged.
In exchange for free performance, the author would appreciate being notified of when and for what purpose the play is performed.
He may be contacted at soulcommunication@paradise.net.nz
Or at: 36B Stourbridge St, Christchurch 2, New Zealand.